Actress Samantha Ruth Prabhu has issued a clarification after receiving backlash for recommending hydrogen peroxide nebulisation to treat viral infections.

Actress Samantha Ruth Prabhu has ended up courting controversy with a post on using a mixture of hydrogen peroxide and distilled water through a nebuliser to treat a viral infection. The popular actress suffers from an autoimmune condition called Myositis and has been hosting a health-related podcast. In a recent social media post, she gave her fans a glimpse into her nebuliser remedy, which she claims to use as an alternative treatment for a common viral infection. This post drew severe criticism from a popular hepatologist, who challenged her claims and called her a “health and science illiterate”. In a latest post, Samantha has given a clarification, and stated that “My intentions are only to help others, not to harm anyone”.

It so happened that on July 4, 2024, the actress shared a picture of herself, where she gave a glimpse of how she has been treating her viral infections by using a mixture of hydrogen peroxide and distilled water. Along with the picture, she wrote, “Before taking medication for a common viral, consider trying an alternative approach. One option is to nebulise with a mixture of hydrogen peroxide and distilled water. Works like magic. Avoid unnecessary use of pills,” Samantha posted on her Instagram story.

Soon after that, Samantha received backlash from Dr Cyriac Abby Philips aka The Liver Doc on Twitter. The doctor warned people against the use of hydrogen peroxide for nebulisation.

Check out the tweet here!

Samantha Ruth Prabhu issues clarification on her hydrogen peroxide nebulisation post

Following the backlash, Samantha Ruth Prabhu has clarified that her doctors suggested alternate therapies when the conventional treatments did not work for her. She even pointed out that just like she had been advised to try Ayurveda, homoeopathy, acupuncture, Tibetan medicine and pranic healing, she was also recommended nebulisation therapy, which worked for her.

“I am not naive enough to go about strongly advocating a treatment. I merely suggested with good intentions because of all that I have faced and learnt in the last couple of years. Especially since treatments can be financially draining and many may not be able to afford them. End of the day, we all depend on educated doctors to guide us. This treatment was suggested to me by a highly qualified doctor who is an MD, who has served DRDO for 25 years. He, after all his education in conventional medicine, chose to advocate an alternative therapy,” says Samantha in her post.

Check out Samantha Ruth Prabhu’s Instagram post here!

Asserting that she cannot give up on life if medicines are not working, Samantha wished the The Liver Doc was polite. “It would have been kind and compassionate of him had he not been so proactive with his words. Especially the bit where he suggests I should be thrown in prison. Never mind. I suppose it goes with the territory of being a celebrity. I posted as someone who needs medical treatment and not as a celebrity.”

What is hydrogen peroxide?

Hydrogen peroxide is a chemical compound, which is composed of hydrogen and oxygen. It is a pale blue liquid, which is commonly used as a disinfectant, bleaching agent and oxidiser. This chemical compound is also used for medical purposes like wound healing in low concentrations. The National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health states that this colourless liquid has a slightly sharp odour and it can cause irritation to the eyes, nose, skin and throat.

Is it safe to use hydrogen peroxide for nebulisation therapy?

Inhaling hydrogen peroxide is generally not recommended as it can cause irritation and damage to the respiratory tract. Using this chemical compound for nebulisation therapy may cause potential health risks like inflammation, burns and other respiratory issues. According to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, breathing hydrogen peroxide via nebuliser can damage the tissue, and cause pulmonary irritation and mild ocular irritation.

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